Want to learn more about a certain topic?

Merriman’s Take | Stocks vs Bonds


What’s the best asset mix for you? You already know that your two major options are stocks and bonds. The choice between them represents a basic tradeoff: growth vs. stability. Investing in stocks is more likely to produce higher returns than investing in bonds, but with more volatility. read more…

A New Resource for Amazon Employees

Do work for Amazon, or are you considering a career at Amazon?


Navigating the different benefit options can feel overwhelming. That’s why Merriman has created a new resource for Amazonians that has everything you need to know about what’s available to you.

You can find tips and advice on how to get the most out of Amazon’s 401(k), learn about health insurance options and guidance on how to handle the Amazon restricted stock units. We encourage you to take a look and if you have any questions or if you want to discuss in detail how Merriman can help put together a personalized plan, please feel free to reach out.

Merriman Included in Top 300 RIAs by Financial Times

We are excited to announce that Merriman Wealth Management was recognized as one of the Top 300 Registered Investment Advisers (RIAs) in 2018 by Financial Times!

Financial Times uses a number of quantifiable and objective measures of investor-centered criteria to select the top firms, including assets under management (AUM), AUM growth rate, years in existence, compliance record, industry certifications and online accessibility. We are proud to be named in this elite group.

To read the full Financial Times special report click here.

 

Awards and recognitions by unaffiliated rating services, companies, and/or publications should not be construed by a client or prospective client as a guarantee that he/she will experience a certain level of results if the Firm is engaged, or continues to be engaged, to provide investment advisory services; nor should they be construed as a current or past endorsement of the Firm or its representatives by any of its clients. Rankings published by magazines and others are generally based on information prepared and/or submitted by the recognized advisor. Investment performance generally is not a criteria for an award.  The Financial Times 300 Top Registered Investment Advisers is an independent listing produced annually by the Financial Times. The FT 300 is based on data gathered from RIA firms, regulatory disclosures, and the FT’s research. The listing reflected each practice’s performance in six primary areas: assets under management, asset growth, compliance record, years in existence, credentials and online accessibility. This award does not evaluate the quality of services provided to clients and is not indicative of the practice’s future performance. Neither the RIA firms nor their employees pay a fee to The Financial Times in exchange for inclusion in the FT 300.

 

 

Traditional or Roth 401(k)?

Often employers offer the option of contributing to a traditional 401(k) or a Roth 401(k). Do you know which one is right for you?

The primary difference is in the tax treatment. The traditional 401(k) gets a tax benefit at the time of contribution, because money contributed to such an account is not taxed. Moving forward, the earnings in your traditional 401(k) are not taxed as long as the funds remain in the account. When you begin to make withdrawals in retirement, the funds withdrawn are taxed as ordinary income.

Roth 401(k)s are taxed the reverse way. In these accounts, money is taxed when the contribution is made. Earnings on investments in your Roth 401(k) account are not subject to tax, and the money is not taxed when it’s withdrawn.

If the investor’s marginal tax rate is the same at the time of contributions and withdrawals, the traditional and Roth accounts would produce the same results.

Because of these differences in tax treatment, taxpayers in the lowest tax brackets should contribute to Roth accounts, while taxpayers in higher tax brackets will want to use traditional retirement accounts. As a general strategy:

When you’re in the 12% tax rate or lower: Contributions should be made to a Roth 401(k).

When you start moving into the 22% tax bracket: 50% of contributions be made to a traditional 401(k), and 50% to a Roth 401(k).

In your peak earning years: As you move into years with marginal tax rates above 22%, most or all retirement contributions should be made into a traditional 401(k) instead of the Roth.

If you’re still not sure which option is right for you, we’re happy to help.

Hiring an Advisor? Watch this first.