Determining Which Term Life Insurance Policy Makes the Most Sense

Term life insurance is used primarily for pure income replacement (i.e., your human capital). When you apply for term life (non-permanent) insurance, you have to choose the amount of coverage you want ($50,000 to more than $2,000,000) and the term of the policy – usually a 10-, 15-, 20- or 30-year policy. The coverage amount and term depend on your specific needs, such as taking care of young children, or paying off the mortgage if you pass away unexpectedly.

Since term life insurance policy premiums stay level, i.e., the same, your premium does not change during the term. This causes the premium to be higher for longer terms. At the end of the term, you either lose life insurance coverage or apply to obtain a new policy with a different term, conditions and premium costs.

How the Premium Is Determined
Your premium is determined by your age, gender and health rating, multiplied by a stated factor for the term and coverage amount you’re applying for. The health rating component requires an insurance physical exam where a nurse visits you at home or at work, or you can go to a doctor’s office.

When deciding how much insurance to get, consider the costs of raising a child and potential college tuition, plus the mortgage, funeral costs and any other potential debt. For lower coverage amounts, such as under $250,000, many companies offer simplified issue insurance, which you usually receive advertisements for by mail from your mortgage lender or homeowner’s insurance company. This type of life insurance doesn’t require a medical exam and can be approved in just a couple of days. (more…)

Why Unrealized Gains/Losses Isn’t the Best Way to Look at Performance

When trying to figure out your own performance, it’s common to look at your unrealized gain and loss first on your statement (Charles Schwab, Fidelity, TD Ameritrade). The problem with trying to evaluate performance based upon the gain and loss column alone is that it doesn’t reflect your total return and the impact of rebalancing.

Rebalancing entails selling assets that have grown beyond your target and buying assets that have fallen below your target, meaning, selling overvalued securities to buy undervalued securities. When rebalancing occurs, the assets sold likely had a large unrealized gain. Once sold, that gain is wiped out and the proceeds are re-invested in an asset that may show an unrealized loss or a much smaller gain. Rebalancing helps avoid your portfolio drifting too far from your target allocation of stocks, bonds and specialized investments to reduce your risk if the stock market were to decline. Furthermore, rebalancing takes advantage of the shift over time in which assets are in or out of favor.

Total return takes into consideration changes in the price of the asset (unrealized gain/loss), dividends, interest and capital gains distributions received. For many investments, such as more income focused mutual funds, most of the return comes from the components of total return that are not reflected in the unrealized gain or loss column on the statement. Below is the formula to calculate total return. (more…)

How to report a backdoor Roth IRA contribution on your taxes

In practice, the process of making a backdoor Roth IRA contribution is straightforward, but the documentation and reporting at tax time may be confusing. Whether you work with a professional tax preparer, use tax software such as TurboTax or complete your taxes by hand, understanding the mechanics of the money movements can help ensure you file your taxes correctly.

Let’s say you make a contribution to your Traditional IRA. If your income is too high to qualify for a deduction for the IRA contribution, the contribution is considered non-deductible. Your advisor doesn’t let the custodian (such as Charles Schwab, Fidelity or TD Ameritrade) know whether the contribution is deductible – you report it at tax time on IRS form 8606, Nondeductible IRAs. You use the form to keep track of basis in your Traditional IRA, and basis in this sense means after-tax contributions, to make sure you don’t pay tax on those exact dollars twice.

After you make the non-deductible IRA contribution, it’s converted, i.e., transferred from your Traditional IRA to your Roth IRA account. From that point on, those dollars are now Roth IRA assets and aren’t subject to future tax on earnings. If the conversion is never made, you’ll have basis, i.e., after-tax contributions in your Traditional IRA that you’ll need IRS form 8606 to keep track of. This ensures you aren’t subject to income taxes on withdrawals of that basis in the future, such as in retirement.

Around tax-time, you’ll receive a 1099-R from your custodian showing the distribution from your Traditional IRA that was converted to your Roth IRA the previous year. After tax time, closer to May, you’ll receive an information reporting Form 5498 that shows the contribution you made to the Traditional IRA, and the amount that was converted to Roth IRA for purposes of reconciliation and recordkeeping.

Let’s walk through the reporting process for a backdoor Roth IRA. (more…)

Things to Remember Around Tax Time if You’ve Made a Qualified Charitable Distribution

Form 1099-R is issued around tax time to report distributions you took during the previous year from a retirement account. Among other things, this form tells you and the IRS how much was withdrawn in total, how much of the distribution was taxable and whether there was any withholding for federal and state income taxes.

For those who gave part or all of their required minimum distribution directly to charity through making a qualified charitable distribution (QCD), this amount is still included in the taxable portion of your total distribution on form 1099-R. As you’ll see, the QCD is included in your gross distribution (box 1) and taxable amount (box 2a); however, the box for “taxable amount not determined” (box 2b) will be checked. Whether you work with a professional tax preparer, use software like TurboTax or prepare your own taxes by hand, it can be easy to forget that the QCD portion of your distribution should not be included in your taxable income on your tax return. It’s important to keep a record of any QCDs made during the year and hold on to the receipts or letters that you receive from the charities confirming receipt of the funds. (more…)

A More Efficient Way to Give: Donor-Advised Funds


 
Being philanthropic can mean you donate your time, expertise and/or financial resources to support a charitable organization. When donating financial resources, there are ways to give that maximize the benefit of the gift. Did you write a check? If so, where did that cash come from? Did it require you to withdraw from a retirement account, or realize any capital gains to create this cash? If you have a taxable investment account, then using a donor-advised fund is a more efficient way to give.

What is a donor-advised fund? 

A donor-advised fund (DAF) acts like your own mini-charitable foundation. DAFs have been around since the early 20th century, but more recently have become the fastest growing method of giving in the United States. Grants to qualified charities in 2015 alone from donor-advised funds totaled $14.52 billion. You can donate assets to a DAF and receive the tax benefit that year, while having the flexibility to distribute the funds in increments, and over whatever period you’d like. Unlike private foundations, DAFs don’t have legally required annual distributions.

What can be put in a donor-advised fund? 

  • Cash
  • Publicly traded securities including stocks, bonds and mutual fund shares
  • Restricted and controlled stock * Privately held stock
  • Real estate
  • Proceeds from life insurance or from a full-paid policy
  • Private foundation grants or terminations
  • Bequests
  • Named beneficiary of charitable remainder trust
  • Named beneficiary of an IRA, 401(k) or other retirement account
  • Tangible personal property

Most commonly, families donate appreciated securities such as stocks and mutual fund shares from a taxable investment account to a DAF.  (more…)

The Ins and Outs of Deferred Compensation Plans

If your income is greater than $400,000 a year, does making a $18,000 deferral to your company’s 401(k) retirement plan do much toward replacing your income in retirement? This less than 5% of income deferral to your retirement plan would leave you significantly underfunded to maintain your lifestyle in retirement. While you can save elsewhere through non-retirement accounts, your company may permit you to postpone receiving income through a Section 409A deferred compensation plan.

There are no IRS limits on how much compensation can be deferred; however, your company’s plan may have a limit. You could defer a bonus, incentive, or part of your salary in the present year and receive that, plus the potential for earnings on its investments, in future stated years. To do this, you must make an irrevocable election to defer compensation prior to the year in which you expect the compensation to be earned. If you’re in the top tax bracket (39.6% in 2017), this can allow you to defer income now and receive it at a later date (such as when you retire) in a lump sum or a series of payments when you expect to be in a lower tax bracket.

The major requirement to receive this deferral status is that your funds are subject to substantial risk of forfeiture. Unlike 401(k), 403(b), and 457(b) accounts where your plan’s assets are qualified, segregated from company assets, and all employee contributions are 100% yours, a Section 409A deferred compensation plan is nonqualified, and your assets are tied to the company’s general assets. If the company fails, your assets are subject to forfeiture, as creditors would have priority. Only through accepting this risk does the IRS permit unlimited contributions to this plan. If your employer doesn’t include this deferred compensation as part of the company’s general assets, making them subject to forfeiture, the deferred compensation becomes taxable immediately, plus a 20% penalty and interest. A potential reason for this requirement of substantial risk of forfeiture is to incentivize executives and business owners to maintain the health of the company, and to ensure they don’t inappropriately withdraw too much of its resources, and then try to leave. (more…)