What The SECURE Act Means For You

What The SECURE Act Means For You

 

You may have heard about the significant tax and retirement reforms recently signed into law under the catchy name Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act. These sweeping changes were drafted to promote increased retirement savings by expanding access to retirement savings vehicles, broadening options available inside retirement plans, and incentivizing employers to open retirement savings plans for their employees.

Some of these changes have a much wider impact than others, but here is a summary of the key takeaways and provisions of the SECURE Act most likely to affect you.

The age to begin required minimum distributions (RMDs) increased from 70 1/2 to 72. The later RMD age of 72 will only apply to those turning 70 1/2 in 2020 or later. Anyone who turned 70 1/2 in 2019 will still be subject to the original RMD rules. While not a huge delay, individuals could benefit from an extra year and a half of compounding returns if they choose not to withdraw funds from their Traditional IRA. It can also provide additional time to make strategic Roth conversions while in a lower tax bracket. It is important to point out that the Qualified Charitable Distribution age has not changed, so QCDs can still be made starting at age 70 1/2.

The maximum age to contribute to a Traditional IRA has been removed. You may now contribute to a Traditional IRA even if you are over 70 1/2. This is a great benefit to those continuing to work into their 70s, as contributions to a Traditional IRA are tax-deductible. After your RMDs have started, continued contributions allow for an offset of the taxable income realized from these required IRA distributions.

The Stretch IRA rule, allowing non-spouse beneficiaries to “stretch” distributions from an Inherited IRA over the course of their lifetime, has been eliminated. This provision, enacted as the funding offset for the bill, requires that non-spouse beneficiaries distribute all assets from an Inherited IRA within 10 years of the account owner’s passing. Spouses, chronically ill or disabled beneficiaries, and non-spouse beneficiaries not more than 10 years younger than the IRA owner will still qualify to make stretch distributions. Minor children will also qualify for stretch distributions, but only until they reach the age of majority for their state (at which time they would be subject to the 10-year payout rule). These new rules only apply to inherited IRAs whose account owner passed away in 2020 or later.

This change will have the most significant impact on adult children inheriting IRAs, who now will have to recognize income over a 10-year period instead of over their lifetime. For those still in their prime working years, this may mean taking distributions at more unfavorable tax rates. Trusts named as IRA beneficiaries also face their own set of challenges under the new law. Many are now questioning whether they should start converting Traditional IRA assets to a Roth IRA, or significantly increase conversions already in play. Unfortunately, there’s not a one-size-fits-all answer to this question. It’s highly dependent on a number of factors, including current tax brackets, potential tax brackets of future beneficiaries, and intentions for the inherited assets. We’ll explore this and additional estate planning concerns and strategies in more depth in future articles.

Here are a few other changes that are worth mentioning:

  • Penalty-free withdrawals of up to $5,000 can be made from 401(k)s or retirement accounts for the birth or adoption of a child.
  • 529 accounts can now be used to pay back qualified student loans with a lifetime limit of $10,000 per person.
  • Tax credits given to small businesses for establishing a retirement plan have been increased.
  • A new tax credit will be given to small businesses adopting auto-enrollment provisions into their retirement plans.
  • Liability protection is provided for employers offering annuities within an employer-sponsored retirement plan.

If you have questions or concerns about how the SECURE Act impacts you, please reach out to your financial advisor or contact us for assistance.

 

 

 

What Are Your Financial New Year & New Decade Resolutions?

What Are Your Financial New Year & New Decade Resolutions?

 

It’s the start of a new year, a new decade even. For a lot of us it means setting new intentions or revisiting goals that may have been forgotten. It also means having to fight for a treadmill at the gym (at least for the next month or so). As you think about the year ahead, what resolutions or intentions are you setting in your financial life?

Here are a few tips on the best way to create and stick to a resolution, according to science:

The more specific the better.

Saying you will save more is too vague to be able to gauge your success. Most likely you’ll lose track of your progress and abandon this resolution at some point in the year. Try creating goals with specific metrics you can track, like “I will increase my contribution to my 401(k) from 5% of salary to 8%.” Or if you’re saving for a specific goal, like a down payment, determine a specific amount to set aside per month.

Set yourself up for success.

Ask yourself how likely you are to meet the resolution you set. If the percentage is below 75%, consider making the goal more achievable. If you want to pay off all your debt by the end of the year, you may get discouraged if an emergency expense comes up and you aren’t able to meet your goal despite your best effort. Instead, try setting an amount to put towards your student, car, or home loan that you feel confident you can maintain throughout the year.

Knowledge is power.

Many people draw a blank when asked how much they spend each month. Trying to budget without knowing what current spending looks like is a bit like trying to lose weight without actually tracking your weight. Reviewing your spending each month and understanding where your money is going will make you a more conscientious consumer. There are many great free online budgeting solutions that you can start using now.

Reward yourself.

Associations are powerful. We avoid things we don’t want to do and, in the process, those tasks can start to pile up and feel more burdensome to even start. Take some of the doom and gloom out of working on your finances by making the process more enjoyable. Have a special treat or drink while you budget. Play some of your favorite music while you review your retirement account. Tackling your finances in smaller, more frequent chunks of time will also make the process more palatable.

Ask for help.

Sometimes we get stuck, and that’s okay. If you have a financial advisor, leverage them as a resource to get guidance when needed. Often, we just need a little nudge in the right direction to get back on track.