Hedging higher tax rates with Roth conversions

With the Bush-era tax cuts set to expire at the end of 2012, many investors are seeking ways to hedge against a potential increase in tax rates for 2013 and beyond. One option that should not be overlooked is the use of Roth conversions.

A Roth conversion allows you to pay tax on the converted IRA assets now, with those assets then growing tax-free for the rest of your life. It is generally preferable to defer taxes for as long as possible, but in a situation where tax rates may increase in the future, it may be worth locking in the taxes at today’s rates. For example, the top tax rate in 2012 is 35%; In 2013, the top tax rate may be as high as 43.4% (39.6% top marginal rate plus the 3.8% “Medicare surtax”). If tax rates don’t increase, you can always undo the conversion by recharacterizing the Roth back to a traditional IRA. As long as a recharacterization is done by the extended due date of the tax return (October 15th), you’ll just be back to where you started.

It is also important to recognize that a Roth conversion may bump you up into a higher tax bracket in the year of the conversion, depending on the amount converted. In that case, you should consider a partial conversion, where you only convert enough to stay within your current tax bracket. This is where the assistance of a tax professional can be invaluable.

Everyone’s situation is different, and whether a Roth conversion makes sense for you will depend on your particular circumstances and desires. Your financial advisor and CPA can help you weigh the costs and benefits of such a strategy to determine if it is right for you.

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