What is a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)?

The RMD is the amount that Traditional, SEP, SIMPLE IRA owners and qualified plan participants must begin distributing from their retirement accounts in the year in which they reach 70.5.  The RMD must then be distributed each subsequent year.

The standard deadline for taking your RMD is December 31st.  However, you can use a one time exemption for your first RMD and delay until April 1st of the following year.  If you choose to utilize this deferral you will have to take both your first and second year distributions that year.

The amount of your RMD is calculated by dividing the year end value of all of your IRAs by your distribution factor.  Your distribution factor can be found using the IRA Uniform Lifetime Tables which are prepared by the IRS.

Expiring Tax Provisions

It seems like every year there’s a slew of tax breaks in danger of expiring.  Sometimes Congress extends the tax break, other times they actually expire and fall by the wayside. 2011 is no different, with 3 potentially useful tax breaks on the cutting room table.  Those who may be able to benefit from these tax breaks should consider taking advantage of them soon, before it’s too late.

  • Sales Tax Deduction – Individuals who itemize their deductions can elect to deduct their sales tax or their state and local income taxes, whichever is greater.  There are seven states without a state income tax, so those residents would surely elect the sales tax deduction.  Residents of other states may find that they paid very little in state income taxes and may decide to elect the sales tax deduction instead.  For those who are taking the sales tax deduction and considering a large purchase, such as a new car, it may be worthwhile to complete the purchase this year in order to maximize this tax benefit while it’s still available.
  • Energy Efficiency Credit – Individuals can take a credit of up to $500 for making energy efficient improvements to their homes, including upgrades for roofs, doors, insulation, windows, furnaces, air conditioners, and many others.  There are limitations on the amount of eligible credit for the various improvements, and you can find a list of those here. It’s also important to note that unlike many other credits, this one is a lifetime credit–so if you’ve utilized all of the $500 credit in the past, you cannot take any more regardless of your qualified expenditures now.  However, if you haven’t benefited from this tax break yet, and are considering making energy efficient improvements to your home, you may want to do so before year end.
  • Qualified Charitable Distributions from IRAs – Individuals older than 70 ½ can make tax-free distributions from their IRA to qualified charities.  The distribution is not includable in the donor’s income, but it is not deductible as a charitable donation either.  This provision primarily benefits individuals who are charitably inclined but don’t have enough deductions to itemize.  The qualified charitable distributions will count towards an individual’s required minimum distribution (RMD) for the year, allowing those who don’t need the money from their IRA to donate it without being taxed on it.  With year-end fast approaching, individuals who have yet to take their RMD may want to consider this option.

Each of the tax breaks above had been due to expire at some point in the past but was subsequently extended at the last minute.  It is possible that Congress will extend these breaks again, but nothing is certain given the deficit and debt problems currently facing our country.

If you think you may benefit from any of these tax breaks, please be sure to consult with your accountant to see how these tax savings may apply to your specific situation.

Stretch IRA?

Have you ever heard the term “stretch IRA”? According to the IRS, there is no such thing. What has become known as a stretch IRA is really a withdrawal strategy geared to spread the tax-deferred status of your IRA assets across multiple generations. Basically this is a provision you can add to any traditional IRA, ROTH, SEP-IRA, or SIMPLE IRA by using a beneficiary designation form.

Typically, a spouse is named as the primary beneficiary of an IRA, with children as the contingent beneficiaries. In this approach, after your death your surviving spouse rolls the balance of your IRA into his or her own IRA. This will allow your spouse to use the money from your IRA to cover his or her living expenses.

Alternatively, if your spouse will not need the assets in your IRA for living expenses in retirement, then you may consider naming your children and/or grandchildren as the primary beneficiaries. This will create the “stretch IRA.” After your death, your beneficiaries would each acquire what’s known as an inherited IRA from which he or she would have to withdraw a required minimum distribution each year thereafter. Here is an example to illustrate:

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Can you benefit from a “Backdoor” Roth?

Since their introduction in 1998, Roth IRAs have become an important part of the financial planning landscape. They offer the unique ability for investors to grow their money tax-free, not simply tax-deferred like traditional IRAs. They also avoid required minimum distributions so they can grow undiminished for many years. In fact, Roth IRAs are wonderful assets to pass along to the next generation, where they can continue to grow tax-free even longer.

Until recently, this unique retirement vehicle was available only to individuals with incomes below certain thresholds. “High-income” individuals could not contribute to Roth IRAs or convert traditional IRAs into Roth IRAs. Some of this changed in 2010, when the Roth conversion income limitations were permanently repealed. Now, anyone (regardless of income) can make a Roth conversion.  However, the Roth contribution limitation was not repealed. This means that if your income exceeds the levels in the table below, you cannot contribute directly to a Roth IRA—but you can achieve the same result by first contributing to a non-deductible traditional IRA and then converting it to a Roth IRA.

This presents an interesting opportunity for high income individuals, who perhaps yearn to save beyond their 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans or who simply desire the account diversification that comes with adding a Roth vehicle to their retirement mix. (more…)