A Guide to Average Home Maintenance Costs

A Guide to Average Home Maintenance Costs

 

Purchasing a new home involves a great deal of money, especially if you remain in the same house for years. To keep your home systems and appliances functioning smoothly, you also need to spend money on maintenance. This blog will help you understand the average home maintenance costs and how you can reduce them significantly.

 

What Is the Average Home Maintenance Cost?

According to a survey by the National Association of Home Builders in 2019, the typical cost of minor repairs and regular maintenance is $950 per year. This amount is based on the average single-family house and is subject to change based on several factors. For instance, the cost does not include expensive repairs and maintenance of items like the roof, swimming pool, HVAC, and other significant home features. Additional factors that can swing the cost of maintenance include the location of your house, the area of your house (in square feet), and the size of your family.

 

How Much Should You Budget for Home Maintenance?

A general rule of thumb states that you should keep 1% of your house value as a fund for general maintenance. For instance, if your house costs $500,000, then you should be prepared to pay up to $5,000 for maintenance. However, recent trends indicate that a growing number of homeowners are keeping aside up to 4% of their house value in their maintenance fund.

Another method, the square footage rule, states that you should keep $1 per square foot of your house for maintenance. Thus, for a 3000-square-foot property, you can expect $3,000 for maintenance. However, this method does not factor in the age, location, or the condition of your house.

 

What Are the Activities Included in Maintenance Costs

At times, people get confused between repair costs and maintenance costs. Maintenance of your house includes activities to keep your house clean and maintained. It also includes activities that allow seamless functioning of your appliances and home systems. Wondering what these are? Here’s a list of few of them:

 

  1. Cleaning the home deck or patio
  2. Lawn services
  3. Sidewalk and driveway maintenance
  4. Cleaning the gutters and vents
  5. Servicing your HVAC
  6. Maintaining faucets and sinks
  7. Maintaining the central heating system
  8. Lubricating garage door springs
  9. Pest control and inspection
  10. Regular maintenance of kitchen appliances

 

These maintenance activities are not very costly and can be managed using maintenance savings. However, the house itself might need repairs. Repair costs for fixing roofs, HVAC, structural defects, water heater, and the like can quickly add up. The excess of your maintenance funds can be used for these emergency fixes.

You can also assess the repair costs and set aside some money for such unexpected expenses. Alternatively, you could purchase a home warranty plan that covers these repairs and replacements of home systems and appliances. Check out the best home warranty companies offering reliable services. Your home deserves the best!

 

 

Conclusion

When you buy a house, don’t just consider the down payment, taxes, and renovation costs. Also include the annual maintenance costs. These are recurring charges you need to pay along with your house. There is no definitive range or rule that can exactly anticipate how much you might have to spend, so do what you can to be as prepared as possible.

 

 

Written exclusively for Merriman.com by Sophie Williams.
Sophie Williams is a professional content marketer. She leverages analytical skills from a STEM degree to give an edge to her passion for writing. She is always thinking about how to produce engaging content for her readers. She enjoys finding ways to minimize her living costs and help other struggling homeowners with the same. She also loves writing long rants on books and movies.

 

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. All opinions expressed in this article constitute the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of this article and are subject to change with notice. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

Is Now the Right Time to Buy a Home?

Is Now the Right Time to Buy a Home?

 

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, it seems that Americans have been clamoring over one another to achieve a core component of the American dream: homeownership. And this phenomenon isn’t surprising; people have spent more time at home than ever before, and the obstacles to buying have dropped significantly. I’ve been asked more and more by my clients whether now is the right time for them to buy.

Unfortunately, the answer to this question is not a cut-and-dry yes or no. Homeownership is a commitment that shouldn’t be taken lightly, and there are multiple items to consider before making a decision.

 

Interest Rates

When I speak with potential homebuyers, one of the top reasons they feel an urgency to buy now is due to historically low interest rates. And they are not wrong. As shown in the below chart, 30-year fixed mortgage interest rates in the past year have been at their lowest ever since Freddie Mac began tracking them in 1971.

Source: https://www.macrotrends.net/2604/30-year-fixed-mortgage-rate-chart

 

While some may think that saving 1% on their mortgage rate isn’t a big deal, the truth is that it adds up quickly. Let’s say a homebuyer is comparing two 30-year fixed mortgages for a $500,000 loan amount, one with an interest rate of 3.0% and the other with an interest rate of 4.0%. At first glance, the monthly payments may not look too different: $2,108 per month for the 3.0% loan and $2,387 per month for the 4.0% loan. However, over the course of 30 years, this difference adds up. Over the life of the loan, the 3.0% rate will cost $258,887 in interest paid. Alternatively, the 4.0% rate loan will cost $359,348 in interest. That’s a difference of over $100,000 in interest paid over 30 years!

I certainly understand the concern as it relates to interest rates: How long will the rates stay this low? Since most lenders will not allow you to lock in your rate prior to your offer being accepted on a home, homebuyers are feeling the pressure to buy as quickly as possible. On March 16th, 2022, the Federal Reserve announced its first rate increase since 2018 of 0.25%, with additional interest rates increases on the horizon. While some may take this as a sign to buy a home as soon as possible, it’s important to keep in mind that the Federal Reserve is not required to raise interest rates, and there is still a possibility that they could change course.

 

Down Payment

For many homebuyers, the question of how much cash they should put toward their down payment is often top of the list. Historically, most buyers have targeted a down payment of 20% of the purchase price. Why? you may ask. Lenders have discouraged homebuyers from putting down less than 20% as it reduces the lender’s risk in case the homebuyer stops paying their mortgage.

To encourage buyers to put down at least 20% of the purchase price, most lenders charge Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) to those who do not meet the threshold. The average range for PMI can cost between 0.58% to 1.86% of the original loan amount per year, depending on the homebuyer’s down payment, loan amount, and credit score.2 To put this in dollar terms, if a homebuyer had a $500,000 mortgage and was subject to a 1.00% PMI rate, it would cost them an additional $417 per month.

Though PMI is clearly a cost to be mindful of, recent years have shown more buyers opting to put less than 20% down. From 2017 to 2020, 33.6% of 30-year mortgages carried PMI. This is a sizable increase compared to the share of PMI mortgages from 2011 to 2016 at 25.5%.2

It is also important to keep in mind that a homeowner is not obligated to pay PMI for the life of their mortgage. Once their equity in the home is over 20%, the homeowner can work with their lender to have the PMI cost removed. Equity ownership in a home is not just linked to the amount paid, though. If a homebuyer purchased a home for $500,000 and the home appreciated in value to $550,000, they will have an additional 9% in equity compared to where they started.

Why should someone take out a mortgage with PMI? One of the top reasons is to maintain enough cash in emergency savings. Once the home purchase closes, the buyer is responsible for all maintenance costs—emergency or otherwise. If one must choose between paying PMI and having a sufficient emergency fund, I will almost always recommend prioritizing the emergency fund. Having enough cash on hand to support unexpected costs serves as the foundation (pun intended) for all prudent financial plans.

 

Competition

From speaking with your friends or listening to the news, you may think that everyone has bought a house in the past two years. Your intuition isn’t completely off-base; data from the US Census shows that homebuying peaked at the end of 2020 and beginning of 2021.

Source: https://www.census.gov/construction/nrs/index.html > Current Press Release (Full Report and Tables)

The increase in homebuying in recent history has unsurprisingly led to increased competition and sales prices. According to Redfin, in July 2021, the average home sold for over 102% of the list price.3 This was the height of sale-price-to-list-price ratios since the beginning of 2020. More recently, January 2022 has started off with the average house selling for 100.3% of the list price.

While this is a promising sign that competition has slowed down from its height, the housing market is still quite competitive. This often leaves homebuyers feeling the pressure to make a quick decision and offer over the asking price.

 

Conclusion

In addition to the factors mentioned thus far, there are other considerations to keep in mind when purchasing a home. Do you intend to live in the house for at least five years? Do you have enough cash outside of your emergency fund to pay for routine and unexpected maintenance? Are you ready for the responsibility that comes with owning a home? If not, maybe renting a house is a better option for you.

At the end of the day, choosing to buy a home is a significant financial decision that impacts many facets of your life. If you are left wondering where a home fits into your financial plan, our advisors at Merriman is happy to help you assess your options. Additionally, if you are a first-time homebuyer, please check out our Guide to the Homebuying Process.

 

Sources:
1 https://www.wsj.com/articles/fed-minutes-reflect-growing-unease-over-high-inflation-11641409628
2 https://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/publication/104503/mortgage-insurance-data-at-a-glance-2021.pdf
3https://www.redfin.com/news/housing-market-update-inventory-falls-below-500000/

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable; however, Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal, or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

Retirement Living: Renting vs. Homeownership

Retirement Living: Renting vs. Homeownership

Photo by Skiathos Greece on Unsplash

 

Every retiree’s needs are different, which means that every person who retires will have to make their own decisions about whether they want to own a house or rent one.

Some seniors have already paid off their homes and wish to keep living there; others are prepared to invest in a property where they can enjoy their golden years; still others would prefer to live in a place where they don’t have to control the long-term maintenance of the property.

When it comes to retirement living, what makes more sense: renting or homeownership? There are pros and cons to both sides of this story. Let’s take a closer look.

 

Homeownership: Home Equity Has Value

When thinking about homeownership, it’s essential to consider the various ways that home equity has value for you.

Home equity could turn into extra income as you enter retirement, or it could simply act as enough of an investment to float you through your future years. Using home equity as part of your retirement beyond just living in the house, however, requires that you are comfortable making changes to your income strategy.

Selling your home, renting out your home, or taking a reverse mortgage are all ways that some seniors choose to use their home equity to their advantage in retirement. Just as there are both pros and cons to homeownership in retirement, there are also pros and cons to making these changes to your home.

 

Homeownership: When Keeping a House Makes Sense

Many retirees would be comfortable staying in their house in retirement, but they aren’t sure if that would make sense for them.

If you have a low mortgage, or your mortgage is completely paid off, and you have taxes you can handle, staying in your house is an option.

This may not be possible for those who bought their house more recently. Consider how much the house will continue to cost each month when you have less income in future years; this could help you determine if staying in your house will work for you. Selling may be the best option if you don’t have enough saved for retirement.

It is also vital that you consider how it will be to live in your house in your older years. If you live in a storied house, things like stairs or inaccessible bathrooms could prove to be a big issue to deal with. It’s okay to want to keep your home, but you will also need to be realistic about changes that may be required as you age.

 

Renting: A Reduction in Responsibility

One of the reasons that many seniors choose to rent is that they can reduce their number of house-related responsibilities as they age. Keeping up with all the needs of a house can be difficult for people of any age, and it can get even more tiring when you are older.

From mowing the lawn to shoveling snow, certain upkeep tasks are nice to hand off to someone else by renting. Additionally, you are no longer responsible for property taxes or similar large financial responsibilities beyond rent and utilities. This can make sense for many people’s retirement plans.

 

Renting: Flexibility and Accessibility

Another benefit of renting for seniors is that you have more flexibility in choosing where you live and how you live.

The rental property managers at Buttonwood explain that apartment units, condo units, and one-story rentals are often great choices for those who want to have a more accessible living environment. They go on to say, “When renting, it is also possible to change where you are living without significant cost. Unlike buying and selling houses, you can simply end a lease, start a new one, and move to your new location. This gives flexibility that a lot of seniors like to have in retirement.”

Moving as you please in order to be closer to family or friends is a big benefit of renting over buying for many people in retirement.

 

Homeownership vs. Renting: The Advantages

Choosing between homeownership and renting is going to be a difficult decision no matter what. However, you can start to narrow down your choice by thinking about what you need most in a home. What types of advantages are going to be most beneficial for your lifestyle? Consider those needs and then compare them to this list of advantages for each living situation:

Homeownership Advantages

  • Staying Situated
    Many people like to continue to live in a home that they feel has long-term stability and doesn’t rely on another person (i.e., a landlord) to be involved. This provides both physical and emotional stability for many.
  • Tax and Financial Benefits
    There are several tax perks for owning a home that do not apply to renters. Additionally, homeowners who have paid off their homes may find it significantly more affordable to live in said home. Plus, equity is something that you can keep growing or pass down your line.
  • A Home of Your Own
    A lot of retirees have worked their entire lives to be able to call their home theirs, and they want to keep living there. This allows you to personalize as you please without needing to follow any landlord rules for alterations.

Renting Advantages

  • Flexible Living Situation
    You can move as your needs or desires change, and you can do so without dealing with the stress of selling and buying homes.
  • Accessible Options
    Find homes that will allow you to avoid home maintenance or live without climbing stairs; these things become important in later life.
  • Balance Expenses
    Renting is often less expensive from month to month since property taxes, mortgage payments, house maintenance costs, and HOA fees may be eliminated.
  • Free Up Finances
    Selling a house and moving to rent instead gives you more money that you can use to invest or enjoy your golden years.

 

Whether you are delaying retirement to increase your savings before you stop working or you’re ready to move into this stage of your life, consider the pros and cons of homeownership versus renting before you take the next steps. You’ll be better situated if you ensure that you know what you are getting into in advance.

 

 

Written Exclusively for Merriman.com by Madison Smith

Madison Smith is a personal and home finance expert at BestCompany.com. She works to help others make positive financial stride in their lives by providing expert insight on anything from credit card debt to home-buying tips.

 

Disclosure: All opinions expressed in this article are for general informational purposes and constitute the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of the report. These opinions are subject to change without notice and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

 

Beware of the Tax Cost of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

Beware of the Tax Cost of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

 

Since the financial downturn and real estate crisis in 2007–09, residential real estate in many parts of the country has seen a significant increase in value. This increase has created additional considerations for homeowners deciding if they want to sell an existing property or convert it into a rental.

 

Rental properties are taxed differently than personal residences. In some cases, these can make it tempting to move into an existing rental property for a few years to reduce the taxable income on the sale.

 

Homeowners also need to be mindful of the reverse—how the decision to turn a primary house into a rental property can be a poor tax move.

 

Tax Benefits When Selling Your Personal Residence

 

Since 1997, homeowners have been able to use the Section 121 exclusion to exclude up to $250,000 of gains from taxation ($500,000 if married filing jointly) upon the sale of a property. In order to qualify, the taxpayer must own and use the property as a primary residence for two of the past five years. Notably, these two years do not have to be the most recent two years. A taxpayer could live in a property from 2017–2019 then sell the property in 2021 and still qualify.

 

Example 1: Jolene and Max purchased their house in June 2011 for $400,000. They sell in June 2021 for $850,000. Because their total gain is less than $500,000, none of that gain needs to be reported as taxable income when they sell their property.

 

Example 2: Luke and Jenny purchased their home in June 2011 for $400,000. They sell in June 2021 for $1,050,000. Because their gain is $650,000, they will need to include the $150,000 above the $500,000 exclusion in their income. This $150,000 will be taxed at long-term capital gains rates. (NOTE: If Luke and Jenny did significant renovations, those costs can potentially be added to the $400,000 purchase price, reducing the taxable income.)

 

Understanding the Tax Impact of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

 

When deciding to move into a new house, homeowners often have two options for their existing property: they can sell it or turn it into a rental property. While turning a primary residence can offer the appeal of receiving monthly rental income, turning your house into a rental property can have a significant tax hit come tax time if you decide to sell.

 

Example 3: Jolene and Max from Example 1 decide in June 2021 to turn their house into a rental property rather than sell. After 2 years, they decide they would rather not be landlords and sell the property in June 2023 for $850,000. Because they lived in the house as their primary residence for at least two of the last five years, they still qualify for the Section 121 exclusion. In fact, because the rental period happened after they lived in the house as their primary residence, they don’t even need to prorate the gain between periods of qualifying and non-qualifying use as they would if they moved back into the rental property. The only income to be reported is the recapture of any depreciation that was taken during the rental period.

 

Example 4: Jolene and Max from Example 1 decide in June 2021 to turn their house into a rental property rather than sell. In this case, they keep it as a rental property for four years before selling the property in June 2025 for $850,000.

When they sell their house in June 2025, it was only used as a personal residence for one of the past five years. They no longer qualify for the Section 121 exclusion. The entire $450,000 gain will be included in their taxable income. They will also have to recapture any depreciation that was taken during the rental period.

 

Jolene and Max’s decision in Example 4 to rent their house for four years before selling it has resulted in a significantly higher tax bill than they would have had if they sold it immediately or if they had sold it after only a few years of renting out the property.

 

Planning Opportunities for Real Estate that Was Converted into a Rental Property

 

There are several planning opportunities that owners might consider if they are in Jolene and Max’s situation described in example 4. These include:

 

  1. Moving back into the property to re-gain the exclusion
  2. Continue renting out the property until qualifying for a step-up in cost basis
  3. Consider a Section 1031 exchange into a different rental property
  4. Sell the principal residence and purchase a different rental property

 

Move Back into the Property to Re-Gain the Exclusion

 

Individuals can move back into the rental property to regain some of the exclusion.

 

Example 5: Tina and Troy purchased their house in June 2011 for $400,000. They turned it into a rental property in June 2015. In June 2019, they want to sell the house. Because it was a rental property for the past four years, all gains will be included in taxable income.

They decide to move back into their house in June 2019 and sell it in June 2021 for $850,000. They now qualify for the Section 121 exclusion because it was their primary house for at least two of the last five years.

 

When they sell their house in 2021, it had six years of qualified use as a personal residence and four years of non-qualified use as a rental property. The $450,000 of gains will be prorated between $450,000 x 60% = $270,000 that can be excluded and $450,000 x 40% = $180,000 that cannot be excluded.

 

Also, all depreciation that was taken during the four years as a rental property will be included in taxable income when the house is sold.

 

By moving back into their rental property for two years, Tina and Troy were able to exclude some, but not all, of the gains from the years they owned the property.

 

Continue Renting Out the Property Until Qualifying for a Step-Up in Cost Basis

 

Currently, when the owner of an asset dies, that asset gets a complete step-up in cost basis. Any gains that might otherwise have been included in taxable income are erased, and the cost basis is “reset” as if the taxpayer purchased the asset on the date of death.

 

Example 6: Tina and Troy from Example 5 don’t move back into the house in 2019, but they instead continue to rent it out. They live in Washington, and Troy is in bad health. Troy dies in June 2021 when the rental house is worth $850,000.

 

Tina receives a complete step-up in cost basis. It is now treated as if she purchased the house for $850,000. If she sells the house for $850,000, there is no taxable income, regardless of whether it is a personal or a rental property.

 

The example above assumes Troy and Tina live in a community property state like Washington (or California, Texas, or several others). If they live in a common law state, they likely would not receive the full step-up in cost basis described. Also, owners of rental properties receive a step-up in any depreciation taken in addition to the capital gains, providing an even more powerful tax benefit.

 

Consider a Section 1031 Exchange into a Different Rental Property

 

If a taxpayer no longer wants to rent out their current property, but they are willing to have a rental property, they can defer taxes with a Section 1031 exchange into a new rental property. The taxpayer can sell one rental property, purchase a new rental property, and transfer the cost basis. This will delay any taxes until the new rental is ultimately sold.

 

This 1031 exchange is a complicated process that requires working with a broker who specializes in it. This exchange can only be done with rental properties. It cannot be used to turn a rental property into a new primary house.

 

Sell the Principal Residence and Purchase a Different Rental Property

 

The final strategy to consider is to sidestep the issue altogether. If the taxpayer is moving out of a principal house and wants to own a rental property, it may be more tax efficient to sell the principal residence then purchase a different rental property.

 

By selling the principal residence before turning it into a rental property, the taxpayer can exclude all gains up to the $250,000 or $500,000 maximum of the Section 121 exclusion. Then the new rental property can be purchased and managed with a “reset” higher cost basis.

 

Conclusion

 

When moving out of a house, it may be tempting to turn that house into a rental property. There may be benefits to receiving increased cashflow that a rental can provide.

 

However, if you have a property with significant appreciation, consider carefully any decision to rent it out when you leave. This decision to rent out the property may give up far more in tax benefits than are received in new rental income.

 

If you’d like to understand the right approach for you, contact the Merriman team to strategize the decision to rent or sell your property while remaining mindful of the big picture.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

Downsizing? Tips for Getting the Best Property Size

Downsizing? Tips for Getting the Best Property Size

 

Downsizing has been a rising trend among retired and almost retired Americans. But the drama last year due to the pandemic has caused younger Americans to rethink their priorities.

Decade-high unemployment figures, soaring healthcare and health insurance costs, and loneliness have forced a fifth of adults to move homes. Many have made significant decisions about their careers, lifestyles, and relationships.

Americans are rethinking what they value and how they want to spend their precious moments.

Is your monthly mortgage tab far too high? Do you think your family could be just as comfortable in a smaller place (no matter your age)?

You are not alone. Millennials prefer better lifestyles to humongous homes. If you are about to retire and want to make the most of your golden years (paying fewer bills and being around people, not empty hallways or dusty furniture), read on. These tips will help you make the most from downsizing.

 

What is downsizing anyway?

When you move to a smaller home to cut down on the upkeep and mortgage costs, you are downsizing. This change is often associated with retirees or those who are approaching retirement age. But a growing number of younger professionals are opting for a more fulfilled life—as opposed to more square feet.

Candidates for downsizing often do not have a large retirement nest egg and have smaller families.

Although downsizing should help you cut down your costs, that’s not always the case. Soaring demand for homes due to dwindling mortgage rates has triggered a 9.5% increase in prices. Downsizing the square footage of your home may not always result in lower bills. Therefore, you should think and research before executing such a plan. These tips will help you make a more fulfilling choice.

 

Be smart when downsizing

Smart downsizing means ensuring the move results in maximum rewards for your goals. Accordingly, you need to figure out your goals first. Consider how downsizing will affect your cost of living and healthcare. After you take in the considerations and make the calculations, consult the experts and make your move.

 

Figuring out your goals

Oftentimes the goals for downsizing focus on improving your financial state and maintaining or enhancing your lifestyle.

Transamerica did a survey and found that more than 50% of retirees consider cost of living and proximity to family and friends as the most critical factors when choosing where to live. Nearly 40% considered healthcare as the most important.

Concerning financial goals, the objective is to access as much equity as possible or maximize savings on monthly mortgage payments.

As for lifestyle goals, the objective is to minimize any adverse impacts on family and ensure access to services, amenities, and quality healthcare.

What impact will downsizing have on your finances and your lifestyle?

 

Think about how downsizing will affect your expenditure

Reach out to a financial advisor for an objective review of how the move will affect your financial status. Darren Robertson, a real estate agent at Northern Virginia Homes, explains, “A cost reduction of $500 per month in a 15-year, $200,000 mortgage at 4.5% could slash four years from the term and save you $25,000 in payments.”

Downsizing can also help you cut down on living expenses. How much do you spend on groceries, travel, and other services? If changing towns is not out of the question, use this calculator by CNN to estimate how your cost of living would shift.

 

What about healthcare?

If you are about to retire or are retired, consider health costs separately.

Although most Americans 65 years and above are enrolled in Medicare, you should brace yourself for a “health cost gut punch.” Retirees in America incur healthcare costs averaging $122,000 between the age of 70 and death.

Worse still, the inequalities of healthcare services in the US are no longer a myth—the pandemic just made them more apparent.

Look for ways to boost your Health Savings Account and make the most of it. Also, consider where you can access high-quality, affordable healthcare.

 

Consult the experts

Perhaps you are not so proud of some of the moves you made when acquiring your current home. This could be your chance at redemption.

Remember, this is for the long haul. You want to clinch a great deal that is not too far away from family, friends, and opportunities.

Scope the real estate market and reach out to a couple of agents. Find out what they think about the market and about selling your home and downsizing. Also, enquire about smaller homes in the market. If you find some that you like, ask the right questions about them, keeping in mind how much you want to save.

Experienced professionals will help you identify the best options for low-priced homes in your preferred locations. They can even recommend excellent new spots based on real estate projections and trends. They will help you to:

  • Evaluate your financing options.
  • Negotiate great deals amidst stiff competition.
  • Save on taxes and offer practical ways you can cut down your costs.

 

Commit to substantial downsizing

Don’t wait until after the move to start downsizing your belongings. Start to declutter as soon as you make the decision, beginning with smaller items.

Take photos of those kindergarten crafts by the kids (who are all grown up now) and keep the memories in the Cloud. Donate or have a garage sale for old furniture and any other antiques you’ve not touched in ages.

The more you visualize yourself in a smaller space, the more likely you will make it happen.

 

In conclusion, when downsizing, the best property sizes are not always the least in square feet. They are the properties that offer an opportunity to maximize your financial and lifestyle goals. These tips will help you to make smart decisions in this area.

 

 

 Written Exclusively for Merriman.com by Madison Smith

Madison Smith is a personal and home finance expert at BestCompany.com. She works to help others make positive financial stride in their lives by providing expert insight on anything from credit card debt to home-buying tips.

 

 

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

 

 

 

 

 

What Questions Do I Need to Ask a Seller Before Buying a Home?

What Questions Do I Need to Ask a Seller Before Buying a Home?

 

 

As you know, buying a new home is one of the most important financial decisions you will ever make in your life, which is why it’s vital to get it right.

You’ve heard horror stories before. A young couple buying their dream home only to find out six months later that the house’s structure collapsed due to water damage. Or the first-time buyer who gets caught up dealing with a probate attorney because someone was trying to sell an inherited property before the probate process had finished. Yikes.

No matter how confident you are that the house you’re about to buy is the perfect one for you, it’s always wise to ask as many questions of the seller as possible to make sure you’re getting exactly what you paid for, without any nasty surprises. With that said, let’s take a look at some of the questions you need to ask before buying a home.

 

 

How long has the house been for sale?

It’s an almost clichéd phrase that nearly feels like you’re trying to strike up some awkward small talk, yet it’s a very valid question indeed. Knowing how long the house has been for sale is essential to all buyers for several reasons.

Firstly, it gives you a clue as to whether or not the house is reasonably priced. If the property has been on the market for too long, it’s usually an indication that the seller valued the home too high, and you should be able to negotiate down.

Secondly, if the house has been for sale for a while and seems reasonably priced, there’s probably a reason why. While it’s not a major red flag, it’s certainly a cause for suspicion, so keep your eyes peeled and maybe solicit the opinion of an extra property inspector.

 

What is the reason for the sale?

Another obvious yet essential question. You need to know why they are selling the property. Are they downsizing? Pursing a new job in a different city? Moving to a retirement home? It’s all valuable information that you can use to bargain with later. Also, there’s a chance the seller is leaving due to a problem in the area, such as an annoying neighbor or something of the sort.

 

What is included in the sale?

When viewing a property, you need to ask what is included as part of the sale and what isn’t. After all, the seller will probably be taking most of their stuff with them, so you should be aware of what the house will look like once they are gone and what you need to bring with you when you first move in.

 

Are there any natural hazards or dangerous substances?

This is a great question that people forget to ask. It’s always wise to enquire about any hazards that are lurking in and around the house. If this house is in a potential flood zone, you need to know about it.

In addition to this, the seller should inform you about any harmful and toxic materials in the property, such as asbestos, lead paint, and even faulty wiring that could be classed as a fire hazard. They are required to disclose these things by law, but it doesn’t hurt to ask.

 

Is the house in probate?

Sometimes people are looking to sell an inherited house, and they usually want to get it done in a hurry. However, probate is an obligatory process that must be carried out in full; there’s no going around it.

 

The pros and cons of buying a probate house

On the one hand, buying a probate house is an excellent thing because usually it means the price is much lower, as the beneficiaries typically want to get rid of it as soon as possible. This gives you an excellent opportunity to secure a massive profit on the property right out of the gate—and if you wanted, you could even renovate it and flip it for a handsome profit.

However, there are downsides. The probate process is very time consuming, usually taking weeks, months, or even years. If you decide to buy the property, just be aware that you could be in for the long run, and there’s nothing you can do about it. In addition to this, it’s typical for a probate home to be in a below-average condition as most of the previous owners are generally elderly.

This means there is a higher likelihood that the home has fallen into a state of neglect, and things may not be up to code. If they aren’t, that means an added cost for you. The best advice is to hire property inspectors to assess the structure and the electrical and plumbing systems before you sign on the dotted line.

 

Would you consider an offer?

Last but not least, the most important question of all: “Would you consider taking $…?”

In other words, ask for a deal. Negotiate. Barter! It’s probably the most significant investment you will ever make, so even if you shave 1% off the house price, that’s a ton of money saved.

Thanks for reading!

 

Written by: Mike Johnson | Exclusively for Merriman.com

Author Bio: Mike Johnson is a freelance writer and a human rights activist and an enthusiast. He is not employed or associated with Merriman. Through his extensive research and commitment to the field of law, Mike has established himself as a well-decorated writer in this field. Mike currently settles in Las Vegas, and loves starting his day with a shot of espresso and cycling through his neighborhood.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.