The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #5

The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #5

I love working with the tech community. I started my career at Microsoft and have since been inspired by the creative and innovative minds of folks working at tech companies large and small. I also enjoy working with tech employees, because as a personal finance nerd, I get to help people navigate the plethora of benefits available that are often only available at tech companies. Between RSUs, ESPP, Non-Qualified or Incentive Stock Options, Mega Backdoor Roth 401(k)s, Deferred Compensation, Legal Services, and even Pet Insurance, it is the benefits equivalent of picking from a menu of a Michelin three-star-rated restaurant.

 

Through my own experience as a tech employee and my experiences now as an advisor working with tech professionals, I’ve identified some of the biggest financial planning mistakes that can hold the tech community back from achieving financial independence and success.

 

Mistake #5 – Not Hiring an Advisor

 

Yes, I get it. Hiring an advisor means paying fees. And hiring a bad advisor can be more harmful than helpful. But just like everything else in life, there can be a lot of value in employing the knowledge and resources of an expert. I don’t cut my own hair for a reason, and I wouldn’t dream of providing my own defense in any sort of lawsuit. If you have a handle on your investments, are rebalancing your portfolio like a pro, and have done extensive research on your company’s benefits and how to utilize them, then by all means, carry on, you fellow financial-planning nerd. I wish everyone fell into this category, but it is rare that I talk with someone who doesn’t need help in at least one major financial planning area.

 

If you do hire someone, be sure to hire a fee-only fiduciary advisor. You’ll need to explicitly ask this question, and if the answer is no, I suggest you run far, far away. Also, if you’re afraid of commitment, ask what the process and cost is of leaving an advisor if you aren’t seeing value from the relationship. Work with an advisory firm who isn’t going to make it difficult or expensive to end your relationship. Without any significant barriers to exiting the relationship, your advisor will be motivated to make sure you are getting great service and will want to remain a client for years to come. If you’re looking for an advisor you’re compatible with, consider perusing our advisor bios.

 

Be sure to read our previous blog posts for additional mistakes to avoid as a tech professional.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

Beware of the Tax Cost of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

Beware of the Tax Cost of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

 

Since the financial downturn and real estate crisis in 2007–09, residential real estate in many parts of the country has seen a significant increase in value. This increase has created additional considerations for homeowners deciding if they want to sell an existing property or convert it into a rental.

 

Rental properties are taxed differently than personal residences. In some cases, these can make it tempting to move into an existing rental property for a few years to reduce the taxable income on the sale.

 

Homeowners also need to be mindful of the reverse—how the decision to turn a primary house into a rental property can be a poor tax move.

 

Tax Benefits When Selling Your Personal Residence

 

Since 1997, homeowners have been able to use the Section 121 exclusion to exclude up to $250,000 of gains from taxation ($500,000 if married filing jointly) upon the sale of a property. In order to qualify, the taxpayer must own and use the property as a primary residence for two of the past five years. Notably, these two years do not have to be the most recent two years. A taxpayer could live in a property from 2017–2019 then sell the property in 2021 and still qualify.

 

Example 1: Jolene and Max purchased their house in June 2011 for $400,000. They sell in June 2021 for $850,000. Because their total gain is less than $500,000, none of that gain needs to be reported as taxable income when they sell their property.

 

Example 2: Luke and Jenny purchased their home in June 2011 for $400,000. They sell in June 2021 for $1,050,000. Because their gain is $650,000, they will need to include the $150,000 above the $500,000 exclusion in their income. This $150,000 will be taxed at long-term capital gains rates. (NOTE: If Luke and Jenny did significant renovations, those costs can potentially be added to the $400,000 purchase price, reducing the taxable income.)

 

Understanding the Tax Impact of Turning Your Primary House into a Rental Property

 

When deciding to move into a new house, homeowners often have two options for their existing property: they can sell it or turn it into a rental property. While turning a primary residence can offer the appeal of receiving monthly rental income, turning your house into a rental property can have a significant tax hit come tax time if you decide to sell.

 

Example 3: Jolene and Max from Example 1 decide in June 2021 to turn their house into a rental property rather than sell. After 2 years, they decide they would rather not be landlords and sell the property in June 2023 for $850,000. Because they lived in the house as their primary residence for at least two of the last five years, they still qualify for the Section 121 exclusion. In fact, because the rental period happened after they lived in the house as their primary residence, they don’t even need to prorate the gain between periods of qualifying and non-qualifying use as they would if they moved back into the rental property. The only income to be reported is the recapture of any depreciation that was taken during the rental period.

 

Example 4: Jolene and Max from Example 1 decide in June 2021 to turn their house into a rental property rather than sell. In this case, they keep it as a rental property for four years before selling the property in June 2025 for $850,000.

When they sell their house in June 2025, it was only used as a personal residence for one of the past five years. They no longer qualify for the Section 121 exclusion. The entire $450,000 gain will be included in their taxable income. They will also have to recapture any depreciation that was taken during the rental period.

 

Jolene and Max’s decision in Example 4 to rent their house for four years before selling it has resulted in a significantly higher tax bill than they would have had if they sold it immediately or if they had sold it after only a few years of renting out the property.

 

Planning Opportunities for Real Estate that Was Converted into a Rental Property

 

There are several planning opportunities that owners might consider if they are in Jolene and Max’s situation described in example 4. These include:

 

  1. Moving back into the property to re-gain the exclusion
  2. Continue renting out the property until qualifying for a step-up in cost basis
  3. Consider a Section 1031 exchange into a different rental property
  4. Sell the principal residence and purchase a different rental property

 

Move Back into the Property to Re-Gain the Exclusion

 

Individuals can move back into the rental property to regain some of the exclusion.

 

Example 5: Tina and Troy purchased their house in June 2011 for $400,000. They turned it into a rental property in June 2015. In June 2019, they want to sell the house. Because it was a rental property for the past four years, all gains will be included in taxable income.

They decide to move back into their house in June 2019 and sell it in June 2021 for $850,000. They now qualify for the Section 121 exclusion because it was their primary house for at least two of the last five years.

 

When they sell their house in 2021, it had six years of qualified use as a personal residence and four years of non-qualified use as a rental property. The $450,000 of gains will be prorated between $450,000 x 60% = $270,000 that can be excluded and $450,000 x 40% = $180,000 that cannot be excluded.

 

Also, all depreciation that was taken during the four years as a rental property will be included in taxable income when the house is sold.

 

By moving back into their rental property for two years, Tina and Troy were able to exclude some, but not all, of the gains from the years they owned the property.

 

Continue Renting Out the Property Until Qualifying for a Step-Up in Cost Basis

 

Currently, when the owner of an asset dies, that asset gets a complete step-up in cost basis. Any gains that might otherwise have been included in taxable income are erased, and the cost basis is “reset” as if the taxpayer purchased the asset on the date of death.

 

Example 6: Tina and Troy from Example 5 don’t move back into the house in 2019, but they instead continue to rent it out. They live in Washington, and Troy is in bad health. Troy dies in June 2021 when the rental house is worth $850,000.

 

Tina receives a complete step-up in cost basis. It is now treated as if she purchased the house for $850,000. If she sells the house for $850,000, there is no taxable income, regardless of whether it is a personal or a rental property.

 

The example above assumes Troy and Tina live in a community property state like Washington (or California, Texas, or several others). If they live in a common law state, they likely would not receive the full step-up in cost basis described. Also, owners of rental properties receive a step-up in any depreciation taken in addition to the capital gains, providing an even more powerful tax benefit.

 

Consider a Section 1031 Exchange into a Different Rental Property

 

If a taxpayer no longer wants to rent out their current property, but they are willing to have a rental property, they can defer taxes with a Section 1031 exchange into a new rental property. The taxpayer can sell one rental property, purchase a new rental property, and transfer the cost basis. This will delay any taxes until the new rental is ultimately sold.

 

This 1031 exchange is a complicated process that requires working with a broker who specializes in it. This exchange can only be done with rental properties. It cannot be used to turn a rental property into a new primary house.

 

Sell the Principal Residence and Purchase a Different Rental Property

 

The final strategy to consider is to sidestep the issue altogether. If the taxpayer is moving out of a principal house and wants to own a rental property, it may be more tax efficient to sell the principal residence then purchase a different rental property.

 

By selling the principal residence before turning it into a rental property, the taxpayer can exclude all gains up to the $250,000 or $500,000 maximum of the Section 121 exclusion. Then the new rental property can be purchased and managed with a “reset” higher cost basis.

 

Conclusion

 

When moving out of a house, it may be tempting to turn that house into a rental property. There may be benefits to receiving increased cashflow that a rental can provide.

 

However, if you have a property with significant appreciation, consider carefully any decision to rent it out when you leave. This decision to rent out the property may give up far more in tax benefits than are received in new rental income.

 

If you’d like to understand the right approach for you, contact the Merriman team to strategize the decision to rent or sell your property while remaining mindful of the big picture.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #4

The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #4

 

 

I love working with the tech community. I started my career at Microsoft and have since been inspired by the creative and innovative minds of folks working at tech companies large and small. I also enjoy working with tech employees, because as a personal finance nerd, I get to help people navigate the plethora of benefits available that are often only available at tech companies. Between RSUs, ESPP, Non-Qualified or Incentive Stock Options, Mega Backdoor Roth 401(k)s, Deferred Compensation, Legal Services, and even Pet Insurance, it is the benefits equivalent of picking from a menu of a Michelin three-star-rated restaurant.

 

Through my own experience as a tech employee and my experiences now as an advisor working with tech professionals, I’ve identified some of the biggest financial planning mistakes that can hold the tech community back from achieving financial independence and success.

 

Mistake #4 – Poor Risk Management

 

Here are some fun facts for your next socially distant dinner party. If you are a 40-year-old male and you were in a room with one hundred other 40-year-old men, statistically speaking, two of those men will pass away before they reach their 50th birthdays. Another seven will have passed away before they reach their 60th birthdays, and another thirteen won’t make it to their 70th birthday. Close to a quarter of forty-year-old men will die before age 70. Do I have your attention now?

 

I don’t bring these grim statistics up to scare you. I bring them up because I’ve seen first-hand how a failure to plan for risk and the realities of life can cause significant financial harm during an already emotionally devastating time. Nobody enjoys talking about death and disability, but it is a fact of life that we will all pass on at some point. It is only fair to the people we love that we at least protect them financially.

 

Estate Planning and Insurance Planning are often the two most overlooked areas in a financial plan for folks that have not worked with an advisor. Financial advisors will also tell you this is often where we see our clients procrastinate the most. There are many things in life that feel urgent but are not actually important. We put off the important items, like drafting an Estate Plan, to answer our emails and do other tasks that have more of an immediate pull on our time and energy. There will always be those items to complete that feel pressing, but try to think through the consequences of not completing your will or obtaining life insurance if, in fact, your time has actually run out. If you’re looking for an accountability partner and guidance through this process, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us.

 

Be sure to read our previous and upcoming blog posts for additional mistakes to avoid as a tech professional.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #2

The 5 Biggest Financial Planning Mistakes Made by Tech Professionals | Mistake #2

 

 

I love working with the tech community. I started my career at Microsoft and have since been inspired by the creative and innovative minds of folks working at tech companies large and small. I also enjoy working with tech employees, because as a personal finance nerd, I get to help people navigate the plethora of benefits available that are often only available at tech companies. Between RSUs, ESPP, Non-Qualified or Incentive Stock Options, Mega Backdoor Roth 401(k)s, Deferred Compensation, Legal Services, and even Pet Insurance, it is the benefits equivalent of picking from a menu of a Michelin three-star-rated restaurant.

 

Through my own experience as a tech employee and my experiences now as an advisor working with tech professionals, I’ve identified some of the biggest financial planning mistakes that can hold the tech community back from achieving financial independence and success.

 

Mistake #2 – Building and Maintaining Concentrated Stock Positions

 

I consider a concentrated position to be any investment that comprises over a quarter of your investable assets. It can be easy to accumulate a concentrated stock position in the same company that is responsible for your paycheck. If you receive stock as part of your compensation, without a disciplined plan to sell shares on an ongoing basis, you will continue to accumulate more and more company stock. Over the past several years, countless families have become wealthy because of the stock compensation they’ve received and its seemingly never-ending climb in price. While the strategy of holding onto RSUs and ESPP over the recent past has worked out incredibly well, we know that continuing to maintain a concentrated stock position is incredibly risky if you want to ensure you maintain your newly built wealth.

 

There are two explanations for not reducing a concentrated position that I hear most often: (1) My company has outperformed the rest of the market several years in a row. If I believe in my company and our growth prospects for the future, why would I sell? (2) If I sell my company stock now, I’ll have to pay a significant amount of tax on the gain. Let’s debunk each of these as reasons not to diversify:

 

(1) Typically, returns of a single stock position are intensely more volatile than the returns of a market index. This can work out in your favor, or it can work to your detriment. Historically, about 12% of stocks result in a 100% loss.* In addition, approximately 40% of stocks end up with negative lifetime returns, and the median stock underperformed the market by greater than 50%.* This means that a few star performers drive the positive average returns of the market. The odds of randomly picking one of these extreme winners is 1 in 15.* If you’ve been lucky enough to hold one of these outperformers, I encourage some humility around acknowledging that maybe being in the right place at the right time has attributed to your rapid accumulation of wealth.

 

Companies that achieve such success and become the largest company in their sector may become subject to what is called the winner’s curse. Since the 1970s, data shows that sector leaders underperform their sector by 30% in the five years after becoming the largest company in that sector.* Over a long time horizon, you are probably more likely to obtain positive investment returns by ensuring you hold the future Microsofts and Amazons of the world through broad diversification, not concentration.

 

(2) I hate to tell you this, but unless you hold onto an investment until you die, you will have to pay tax on the growth at some point. I encourage people to think of paying long-term capital gains taxes as a good thing, because it means your investments went up and you made money. A surprisingly small fluctuation in stock price can wipe out any benefit of delaying the recognition of capital gains tax. As advisors like to say, “Don’t let the tax tail wag the dog.” If you’d like to discuss your situation, don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

Be sure to read our previous and upcoming blog posts for additional mistakes to avoid as a tech professional.

Source: * Avoid Gambler’s Ruin: Bridging Concentrated Stock and Diversification 

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

What Questions Do I Need to Ask a Seller Before Buying a Home?

What Questions Do I Need to Ask a Seller Before Buying a Home?

 

 

As you know, buying a new home is one of the most important financial decisions you will ever make in your life, which is why it’s vital to get it right.

You’ve heard horror stories before. A young couple buying their dream home only to find out six months later that the house’s structure collapsed due to water damage. Or the first-time buyer who gets caught up dealing with a probate attorney because someone was trying to sell an inherited property before the probate process had finished. Yikes.

No matter how confident you are that the house you’re about to buy is the perfect one for you, it’s always wise to ask as many questions of the seller as possible to make sure you’re getting exactly what you paid for, without any nasty surprises. With that said, let’s take a look at some of the questions you need to ask before buying a home.

 

 

How long has the house been for sale?

It’s an almost clichéd phrase that nearly feels like you’re trying to strike up some awkward small talk, yet it’s a very valid question indeed. Knowing how long the house has been for sale is essential to all buyers for several reasons.

Firstly, it gives you a clue as to whether or not the house is reasonably priced. If the property has been on the market for too long, it’s usually an indication that the seller valued the home too high, and you should be able to negotiate down.

Secondly, if the house has been for sale for a while and seems reasonably priced, there’s probably a reason why. While it’s not a major red flag, it’s certainly a cause for suspicion, so keep your eyes peeled and maybe solicit the opinion of an extra property inspector.

 

What is the reason for the sale?

Another obvious yet essential question. You need to know why they are selling the property. Are they downsizing? Pursing a new job in a different city? Moving to a retirement home? It’s all valuable information that you can use to bargain with later. Also, there’s a chance the seller is leaving due to a problem in the area, such as an annoying neighbor or something of the sort.

 

What is included in the sale?

When viewing a property, you need to ask what is included as part of the sale and what isn’t. After all, the seller will probably be taking most of their stuff with them, so you should be aware of what the house will look like once they are gone and what you need to bring with you when you first move in.

 

Are there any natural hazards or dangerous substances?

This is a great question that people forget to ask. It’s always wise to enquire about any hazards that are lurking in and around the house. If this house is in a potential flood zone, you need to know about it.

In addition to this, the seller should inform you about any harmful and toxic materials in the property, such as asbestos, lead paint, and even faulty wiring that could be classed as a fire hazard. They are required to disclose these things by law, but it doesn’t hurt to ask.

 

Is the house in probate?

Sometimes people are looking to sell an inherited house, and they usually want to get it done in a hurry. However, probate is an obligatory process that must be carried out in full; there’s no going around it.

 

The pros and cons of buying a probate house

On the one hand, buying a probate house is an excellent thing because usually it means the price is much lower, as the beneficiaries typically want to get rid of it as soon as possible. This gives you an excellent opportunity to secure a massive profit on the property right out of the gate—and if you wanted, you could even renovate it and flip it for a handsome profit.

However, there are downsides. The probate process is very time consuming, usually taking weeks, months, or even years. If you decide to buy the property, just be aware that you could be in for the long run, and there’s nothing you can do about it. In addition to this, it’s typical for a probate home to be in a below-average condition as most of the previous owners are generally elderly.

This means there is a higher likelihood that the home has fallen into a state of neglect, and things may not be up to code. If they aren’t, that means an added cost for you. The best advice is to hire property inspectors to assess the structure and the electrical and plumbing systems before you sign on the dotted line.

 

Would you consider an offer?

Last but not least, the most important question of all: “Would you consider taking $…?”

In other words, ask for a deal. Negotiate. Barter! It’s probably the most significant investment you will ever make, so even if you shave 1% off the house price, that’s a ton of money saved.

Thanks for reading!

 

Written by: Mike Johnson | Exclusively for Merriman.com

Author Bio: Mike Johnson is a freelance writer and a human rights activist and an enthusiast. He is not employed or associated with Merriman. Through his extensive research and commitment to the field of law, Mike has established himself as a well-decorated writer in this field. Mike currently settles in Las Vegas, and loves starting his day with a shot of espresso and cycling through his neighborhood.

Disclosure: The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source. Merriman does not provide tax, legal or accounting advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be relied upon as such.

City of Tacoma Employees: Buy-Up Long-Term Disability Insurance Benefit

City of Tacoma Employees: Buy-Up Long-Term Disability Insurance Benefit

 

Starting Monday, January 11 through Friday, January 29, eligible City of Tacoma employees have an opportunity to buy affordable additional long-term disability insurance coverage through the City. While this benefit may not sound too exciting, it represents essential insurance coverage that can protect your income in the unfortunate event that you become disabled.

City of Tacoma employees should sign-up and take advantage of this benefit.

Who am I? My name is Geoff, and I am a financial planner with Puget Sound-based Merriman Wealth Management, LLC. I got excited after seeing the special benefits notice my wife received as a City of Tacoma employee. I do not work for the City or the vendor, and I do not receive any personal benefit from you enrolling in this extra disability coverage. I am just passionate about helping families make the best financial decisions possible and wanted to provide additional information on a topic that can seem overly complicated or may often be overlooked.

The FAQ below illustrates just how important this additional long-term disability coverage is, whether or not you have dependents:

 

What is disability insurance?

This type of insurance is used to protect your income and financial livelihood in the event of an untimely illness or injury.

There are two types of disability insurance: short-term and long-term. Long-term disability coverage is the most valuable because it replaces a portion of your income starting 90 days after your disability until recovery or age 65, whichever is sooner.

 

Don’t I already have long-term disability coverage through the City of Tacoma?

You do. However, for most employees this basic employer-paid benefit only protects 60% of the first $1,500 in monthly pre-disability earnings. This means that if you earn $6,250 a month or $75,000 a year, you will only receive $900 a month in benefits.  Will $900 a month cover your bills?

 

How much extra income protection will this additional benefit provide me?

Up to $4,100 of extra income per month of pre-disability earnings. Combined with the basic employer-provided benefit described above, you could receive up to $5,000 of income replacement (i.e., a total of 60% of $8,333 pre-disability earnings). The employee from question two above, earning $6,250 a month or $75,000 a year, would receive $3,750 a month in benefits, which would go much farther toward being able to cover bills.

Note: Employees earning $100,000 or more would receive the maximum benefit of $5,000 a month.

 

What is the difference between the 90-day and 180-day waiting period options?

This waiting period, otherwise called the elimination period, is how long you have to wait to start receiving long-term disability payments from the insurance carrier. Premiums are naturally higher for the 90-day waiting period option as you will start receiving benefits earlier. The difference in premium for choosing the 90-day waiting period over the 180-day waiting period is offset by starting to receive income 3 months earlier.

 

How much does this benefit cost and how is it paid?

The benefit costs 0.303% of pre-disability earnings up to the pre-disability earnings cap for the 90-day waiting period option. This means the employee earning $75,000 would pay an extra $18.94 per month or $227.28 a year (i.e., 0.303% X $6,250 pre-disability earnings). Employees earning $100,000 or more a year would pay an extra $25.25 per month or $303 a year. This extra benefit far outweighs the additional premium cost.

Note: This premium cost would be deducted via payroll as a post-tax cost.

 

What happens if I stop working at the City of Tacoma?

Generally, you cannot keep group disability benefits like this one offered through the City of Tacoma if you leave (i.e., not portable).

 

If I do become disabled, how does the benefit work? How long would the benefit last?

In the unfortunate event of an illness or injury that qualifies for disability insurance benefits, you would file a claim with the disability insurance carrier that includes medical evidence of your disability. If approved, you would start receiving the above-described benefits after the waiting period until recovering from the disability or age 65, whichever comes first.

 

Would the benefits received from this extra policy be taxable?

Because the premium is paid post-tax rather than pre-tax where you receive a tax deduction for the premium cost, the disability payment you would receive would be tax-free. SAID AGAIN: All of the income received from this extra long-term disability coverage would not be subject to taxation. The tax-free nature of the payments further helps replace your pre-disability income (as your pre-disability income is gross income or otherwise subject to taxes).

Note: Income received from the employer-paid basic long-term disability coverage (i.e., 60% of the first $1,500 in monthly pre-disability income) would be subject to taxation. This is because your employer pays the premiums for this benefit.

 

What if I earn more than $100,000 a year? Do I need additional income protection beyond this extra benefit offered by the City?

Maybe. Start by asking these questions:

  • Does my contribution to covering household expenses exceed $5,000 a month?
  • Do I expect these expenses above $5,000 a month to continue for at least another year?
  • Do I expect my income and expenses to increase in the future?

If you answered YES to these questions (and be conservative on this), then it makes sense to consider buying an additional individual disability policy outside of your City benefits. This is especially important for households with a single earner.

 

An advisor can get quotes through an insurance broker to help you make an informed decision. It is also important to evaluate this decision through the lens of your overall financial plan, taking into account all of your goals and resources.

If you have questions about how much disability insurance coverage you need to protect your income or any other financial planning topics, like whether you are on track to achieve your financial goals, feel free to contact me directly at geoff@merriman.com.

Other useful resources:

 

Disclosure: The opinions expressed in this article are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual or on any specific security. The material is presented solely for information purposes and has been gathered from sources believed to be reliable, however Merriman cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information, and certain information presented here may have been condensed or summarized from its original source.  Merriman does not provide tax or legal advice, and nothing contained in these materials should be taken as such. To determine which investments may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. As always please remember investing involves risk and possible loss of principal capital; past performance is no guarantee of future performance. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Merriman and its representatives are properly licensed or exempt from licensure. No advice may be rendered by Merriman Wealth Management unless a client service agreement is in place.