Can you benefit from a “Backdoor” Roth?

Since their introduction in 1998, Roth IRAs have become an important part of the financial planning landscape. They offer the unique ability for investors to grow their money tax-free, not simply tax-deferred like traditional IRAs. They also avoid required minimum distributions so they can grow undiminished for many years. In fact, Roth IRAs are wonderful assets to pass along to the next generation, where they can continue to grow tax-free even longer.

Until recently, this unique retirement vehicle was available only to individuals with incomes below certain thresholds. “High-income” individuals could not contribute to Roth IRAs or convert traditional IRAs into Roth IRAs. Some of this changed in 2010, when the Roth conversion income limitations were permanently repealed. Now, anyone (regardless of income) can make a Roth conversion.  However, the Roth contribution limitation was not repealed. This means that if your income exceeds the levels in the table below, you cannot contribute directly to a Roth IRA—but you can achieve the same result by first contributing to a non-deductible traditional IRA and then converting it to a Roth IRA.

This presents an interesting opportunity for high income individuals, who perhaps yearn to save beyond their 401(k) or 403(b) retirement plans or who simply desire the account diversification that comes with adding a Roth vehicle to their retirement mix. (more…)

RMDs and Charitable contributions

If you have IRA accounts and are over age 70 ½, then you probably know about the Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) rules. These IRS rules require you to take money out of your retirement accounts each year, whether you need the money or not.

This money could be spent or re-invested back into a taxable investment account to allow it to continue to grow. Some people deposit this money to their checking account, and eventually use it to make a charitable contribution to the charity of their choice.

Fortunately, the government recently extended a provision through 2011, which allows individuals over age 70 ½ to exclude up to $100,000 from their gross income if it is paid directly from an IRA to a qualified charity. In addition, that excluded amount can be used to satisfy the RMD for the year.

This could potentially be a much more tax-efficient way to make charitable contributions than by depositing the RMD amount in your bank account and then writing a check for charity. If you’re a Merriman client, we can help you complete the paperwork accordingly, just give us a call.

To find out more information on this valuable topic, please discuss with your CPA or read this article from the IRS.

It’s not too late to consider a Roth conversion

Please Note: With the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, beginning in 2018 a recharacterization of a Roth conversion is no longer allowed. You may still recharacterize any Roth conversions done in 2017, but this will no longer be allowed for Roth conversions done in 2018 or beyond.


The end of the year is a busy time for most of us. Don’t forget to consider whether the Roth conversion might be worth your while. This year’s deadline, December 31st, is quickly approaching.

The income limitations to convert to a Roth have been repealed for this year and beyond, so anyone with an IRA is now eligible. Also, don’t forget that for 2010 conversions only, you have the option of recognizing the conversion income in the subsequent two years (2011 and 2012). This allows you to receive the benefits of a Roth IRA immediately while delaying the tax hit for a few years.

If you convert now and later change your mind, you can “undo” the conversion with a recharacterization—so you are not necessarily locked into the conversion if you do it this year. You have until the extended due date of your tax return (i.e. October 17, 2011) to recharacterize the conversion if you change your mind.

You may consider doing partial conversions—converting just enough each year to use up the rest of a particular tax bracket, like the 15% or 25% tier. Although this requires more work and planning each year, it’s a great way to gradually gain Roth exposure while sensibly controlling the tax impact.

Your financial advisor or CPA can help you decide if a Roth conversion is right for you. You can also find more information on the pros and cons of a Roth conversion in my article “Roth IRAs: To convert or not to convert.”

Roth IRAs: To convert or not to convert

As a financial advisor and CPA, I often receive tax questions from my clients.  One that has been coming up a lot in the past year is: “Should I convert my non-Roth retirement plan (401(k), traditional IRA, 403(b) or 457(b)) to a Roth IRA?”  The question isn’t surprising, given the new rules that took effect January 1 for Roth IRA conversions.

The short answer, which should not surprise you, is: “It depends.”

The issue is complex, and the answer for one person can be radically different from the answer for someone else. Converting might be a boon, a mixed bag or a mistake, all depending on your circumstances.

It’s worse than that, because the only way to make sure you’re making the right choice is to know some variables of the future which simply cannot be known.

My bottom-line advice is to seek professional advice from your tax advisor, your financial advisor or your tax attorney before you take the plunge.

A word of caution

The difficulty with Roth conversions, like the difficulty for many tax strategies, is that the right answers cannot be known in advance. You usually cannot know your future income for sure. You cannot know what Congress will do to the tax code. And you cannot know future tax rates. In each case, the best you can do is guess. (more…)

What happens to your 401(k) when you leave your job?

What happens to your 401(k) when you leave your job?

Whenever you leave a job, whether it’s your choice or not, there are many details and changes competing for your attention, and it’s easy to overlook the disposition of your employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k), 403(b) or 457.

You don’t actually have to do anything, but doing nothing is usually not your best choice. Making the right choice can let you add many thousands of dollars to your retirement nest egg. Making the wrong choice can unnecessarily squander some of your savings to the tax man and deprive you of future earning power.

You may get some very general guidance from your employer. But employers are prohibited by law from giving you specific advice. The custodian of your retirement plan (Vanguard or Fidelity, for example) has little incentive to overcome a basic conflict of interest: Even though your investment options will be restricted if you leave your money where it is, that’s exactly what your custodian hopes you will do.

This is a choice you need to make on your own. Fortunately it’s neither complicated nor difficult.   In addition, you don’t have to do it immediately (although the lack of a deadline is a mixed bag if it leads you to procrastinate and then become complacent). (more…)